It’s time to take “social” for granted

I would like to declare the social web officially invented already. Hoozah! It was a good, it was fun, like any tech boom, it made it’s share of wiz kids very successful and created a lot of value for the rest of us along the way too. Disastrous timesinks like Icanhascheezburger and Scrabulous not withstanding. Now lets move on.

The big deal in the late 90s was to have a business idea like “it’s a like giant petfood store but… wait for it… on the web

The big deal of this decade was “omg, it’s like [insert whatever here] but we’ll web 2.0 the hell out of it”

Here’s the news. This later idea is no longer interesting. It’s time is done. Now don’t get me wrong, there’s still vast areas of everyday business, enterprise and government that still need to be beaten severely with the Web2.0 stick (even the Web1.0 stick would still help in some places). Rather, it’s now time to think of socialness and 2.0ness as “business as usual” in the IT industry. The substantive battle is over, this is a mopping up operation. And there’s a ton of rolling up the sleeves and value to unlock left to do in almost any vertical industry. [yes you can contact tom[at]thomaspurves.com to learn more about my agreeable professional services rates and lets get started]

Over time, the tools, tricks and interfaces for making social apps will continue to evolve. In much the same way that basic web interface design, SEO and architecting for scalability continues to evolve – as a specialist field, off of the main stage.

However, if you are the next young wiz kid innovator or trying to disrupt everything, forget about social. Oh sure, your app will certainly be social. But that’s just a basic prerequisite now, like an app being webaccessible in the first place is something we can take for granted. Social is no longer the goal onto itself, it’s the baseline from which to build on.

Rather than meta-obsessing over Social and talking about talking about social, it’s time that we all just got on to the next wave of using these great tools available to solve real human, consumer and business problems.

Next week: Building Web3.0, why it’s time to start taking Mobile for granted too…

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  • I totally agree but I cannot see that mobile is taking for granted this quickly. Web 2.0 companies are already on stock markets or had big exits but are there any mobile companies close to this?

    Together with a friend, we just decided to work on a mobile startup in Germany. There will be an internationalized application in the beginning.
    So, we are joining the next big thing and are aware of competition. 😉

    Cornelius.

  • I totally agree but I cannot see that mobile is taking for granted this quickly. Web 2.0 companies are already on stock markets or had big exits but are there any mobile companies close to this?

    Together with a friend, we just decided to work on a mobile startup in Germany. There will be an internationalized application in the beginning.
    So, we are joining the next big thing and are aware of competition. 😉

    Cornelius.

  • Thanks for your comment Cornelius.

    Agreed that mobile is a tougher one to argue. In Canada, it’s far worse than Germany. The market for off-deck mobile applications is practically non-existent, thanks to our wonderfully near-sighted carrier industry. Even the US is hardly that much better. But it will change. It will all change. We can always spend the meantime pushing it to change faster.

    Despite sometimes even the telco industry’s fiercest efforts, for a hundred years the long term trend in connectivity is always heading asymptotically towards free and ubiquitous, at speeds only bounded by moore’s law.

    The social stuff is here and now and done, the mobile is (in my country) completely missing in action, but the point is the same.

    The next-next-wave of really cool ideas will be built on taking them both for granted.

  • Thanks for your comment Cornelius.

    Agreed that mobile is a tougher one to argue. In Canada, it’s far worse than Germany. The market for off-deck mobile applications is practically non-existent, thanks to our wonderfully near-sighted carrier industry. Even the US is hardly that much better. But it will change. It will all change. We can always spend the meantime pushing it to change faster.

    Despite sometimes even the telco industry’s fiercest efforts, for a hundred years the long term trend in connectivity is always heading asymptotically towards free and ubiquitous, at speeds only bounded by moore’s law.

    The social stuff is here and now and done, the mobile is (in my country) completely missing in action, but the point is the same.

    The next-next-wave of really cool ideas will be built on taking them both for granted.